Stock Data Definitions
Valuation
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Analyst Rating
Analyst Rating is an analyst's recommendation for a stock: Buy: the stock is expected to dramatically outperform the average market return and/or the return of comparable stocks in the same sector or industry. It is an analyst's emphatic endorsement of a stock. Outperform: the stock is expected to do slightly better than the market return. Also known as "market outperform", "moderate buy", or "accumulate". Hold: an analyst's recommendation to neither buy or sell a stock. A company with a hold recommendation generally is expected to perform with the market or at the same pace as comparable companies. Also known as "neutral" or "market perform". Underperform: the stock is expected to do slightly worse than the market return. Also known as "market underperform", "moderate sell", or "week hold". Sell: the stock is expected to dramatically underperform compared to the average market return and/or return of comparable stocks in the same sector or industry. It is an emphatic negative comment on a stock's prospects.

Analyst Rating Average
The average of the analyst rating, usually assign the five ratings from buy to sell to numeric values of either 1 to 5 in step of 1 or 1 to 3 in step of 0.5.

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Dividend Yield Percentage
The dividends per share of the company over the trailing one-year period as a percentage of the current stock price.

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Earnings Estimates
Earnings Estimates is analyst's estimate for a company's futuer quarterly or annual earnings.

Earnings Estimates High
Earnings Estimates High is the highest earning estimate by analysts covering a company.

Earnings Estimates Low
Earnings Estimates Low is the lowest earning estimate by analysts covering a company.

Earnings Estimates Mean
Earnings Estimates Mean is the mean earning estimate by analysts covering a company.

Earnings Estimates Days Ago
Earnings Estimates Days Ago is the mean earning estimate 30, 60, 90, or 365 days ago.

Earnings Estimates Growth %
Earnings Estimates Growth % is the growth rate of earning estimate compared to the period year ago.

Earnings Estimates Number of Estimates
Earnings Estimates Number of Estimates is the number of analysts providing the earning estimate.

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Forward P/E
A stock’s current price divided by the mean EPS estimate for the next fiscal year. This ratio can give you an idea of the relative cheapness of a stock when compared to an industry average, the entire market or even the firm’s historical level.

Five-Year Growth Forecast
Five-Year Growth Forecast is the estimate of earning per share growth rate for the next five years.

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Price/Earnings Ratio (P/E)
The Price/Earnings Ratio or P/E Ratio is a stock's current price divided by the company's trailing 12-month earnings per share from continuous operations. A fund's price/earnings ratio can act as a gauge of the fund's investment strategy in the current market climate, and whether it has a value or growth orientation. The (P/E) ratio of a fund is the weighted average of the price/earnings ratios of the stocks in a fund's portfolio. The P/E ratio of a company, which is a comparison of the cost of the company's stock and its trailing 12-month earnings per share from continuous operations, is calculated by dividing these two figures. At Morningstar, in computing the average, each portfolio holding is weighted by the percentage of equity assets it represents, so that larger positions have proportionately greater influence on the fund's final P/E. A high P/E usually indicates that the market will pay more to obtain the company's earnings because it believes in the firm's ability to increase its earnings. Companies in those industries enjoying a surge of popularity (e.g.: telecommunications, biotechnology) tend to have high P/E ratios, reflecting a growth orientation. (P/Es can also be artificially inflated if a company has very weak trailing earnings, and thus a very small number in this equation's denominator.) A low P/E indicates the market has less confidence that the company's earnings will increase; however, a fund manager or an individual with a 'value investing' approach may believe such stocks have an overlooked or undervalued potential for appreciation. More staid industries, such as utilities and mining, tend to have low P/E ratios, reflecting a value orientation.

Price/Book Ratio (P/B)
The price/book (P/B) ratio of a fund is the weighted average of the price/book ratios of all the stocks in a fund's portfolio. Book value is the total assets of a company, less total liabilities (sometimes referred to as carrying value). A company's book value is calculated by dividing the market price of its outstanding stock by the company's book value, and then adjusting for the number of shares outstanding (Stocks with negative book values are excluded from this calculation.). In computing a fund's average P/B, Morningstar weights each portfolio holding by the percentage of equity assets it represents, so that larger positions have proportionately greater influence on the final P/B. The price/book ratio can tell investors approximately how much they're paying for a company's assets, based on historical, rather than current, valuations. Historical valuations generally do not reflect a company's current market value. Value investors frequently look for companies that have low price/book ratios.

Price/Sales Ratio (P/S)
A stock's current price divided by the company's trailing 12-month sales per share. This represents the weighted average of the price/sales ratios of the stocks in a fund's portfolio. Price/sales represents the amount an investor is willing to pay for a dollar generated from a particular company's operations.

Price/Cash Flow Ratio (P/CF)
A stock's current price divided by the trailing 12-month cash flow per share. This represents the weighted average of the price/cash-flow ratios of the stocks in a fund's portfolio. Price/cash-flow represents the amount an investor is willing to pay for a dollar generated from a particular company's operations. Price/cash-flow shows the ability of a business to generate cash and acts as a gauge of liquidity and solvency. Because accounting conventions differ among nations, reported earnings (and P/E ratios) may not be comparable across national boundaries. Price/cash-flow attempts to provide an internationally-standard measure of a firm's stock price relative to its financial performance.

PEG Payback
The number of years it would take for a company's cumulative earnings (beginning at a base level of $1.00) to equal the stock's current P/E ratio, assuming that the company continues to increase its annual earnings at the growth rate used to calculate the PEG ratio. A PEG payback period of six years, for example, means that it would take six years for an investor to recoup the price paid now for $1 of corporate earnings (the P/E ratio). Equivalently, the PEG payback period is the number of years it would take for the cumulative earnings of a company (based on the forecast of future earnings growth used to calculate the PEG ratio) to equal the current price of the stock. In other words, the PEG payback period is the amount of time it would take for the company to "earn" its stock price. For comparison, it is also good to review a stock's PEG Payback period for both the industry and the S&P 500.

PEG Ratio
A stock's price/earnings ratio divided by the company's projected EPS growth. The price/earnings ratio used in the numerator of this ratio is calculated by taking the current share price and dividing by the mean EPS estimate for the current fiscal year. A PEG Ratio means nothing in itself, so for comparison we show the industry and S&P 500 averages.

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